Of Course a Rothschild Would Say That

One of the the things that drew me to writing about conspiracy theories in the first place is having the last name of a family involved in some of the most prominent ones in recent history.

The Rothschild banking family has been accused of everything from funding both sides of pretty much every war of the last several hundred years to crashing world economies at will to controlling the weather to secretly being the ancestors of Adolf Hitler.

I am not related to this family. I know of no connection in my family to anyone in the prominent Rothschild clan, nor has any connection ever been presented to me.

And yet, virtually everything I write about or film related to  debunking conspiracy theories gets rebutted with “of course a Rothschild would say that.”

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Rothschild Central Banks

Writing about conspiracy theories and having the last name Rothschild is an interesting experience. Believers immediately disregard everything I say, usually with a snarky comment that “of course a Rothschild would say that!”

For the record, I have no relation to the European banking scions of the 18th Century. Even so, I feel compelled to debunk conspiracy theories about them, not only because they share my last name, but but because said conspiracy theories are virulent, anti-Semitic, and somehow get generations of people believing them.

A pernicious version of one of these has popped back up in conspiracy circles due to the events of the week, and it’s a claim that, despite having no evidence and not making any factual sense, is impossible to kill: that North Korea is one of a shifting number of countries without a “Rothschild-owned central bank.”

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No, Allison Mack Wasn’t Selling Children to the Rothschilds

Psst. Hey, you. Are you a conspiracy theorist? Do you believe that global elites and wealthy politicians are manipulating world events to advance an agenda of horrific crimes, including mass sex trafficking and false flag wars?

If you are, you probably have a blog, YouTube channel, Patreon page, or some other way to monetize your beliefs. And you probably know that an easy way to bring those sweet, sweet clicks in is to tie whatever conspiracy theory you’re pontificating about to one of several obscenely wealthy international figures: Hungarian philanthropist George Soros, or titans of global banking the Rothschild family (to whom I am not related.)

That’s almost certainly the explanation for a “news” item circulating right wing clogosphere sites and Facebook groups: an explosive “story” that reveals actress and recent sex cult arrestee Allison Mack “sold children” to the Rothschild family as part of her role in the Nxivm pyramid scheme.

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